Monthly Archives: November 2013

Ruby Basics

Although we’re still trying to get Ruby on the Mac, I did get a chance to try it out on another computer. It’s very confusing to jump straight into it, although I do think that’s the best way for me to learn it. I read through the first bit of the chapter on Ruby in the “Seven Languages in Seven Days”, and I did understand a few things. Only a few, though, so my phrasing and understanding may be off. Continue reading

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LAN Networks

There are several types of networks. For this post, I’ll be focusing on the type used at my job: a LAN. LAN stands for local area network. It links computers that are close together geographically, e.g., in the same building. I only understood what networks actually do when I was trying to transfer files from one computer to another. I had had a vague idea that a network had something to do with connecting the computer to the internet (completely incorrect, I realize now). I was clicking around, trying to find how to email the files to myself so I could download them onto the other computer when I clicked on “Network”. (and yes I know I could have opened a browser, gone to my email, opened a new one, and attached the files, but see how long and boring a sentence that is? Doing it in real life is even worse) After clicking on “Network”, I was surprised to find a list of the other computers in the office. Continue reading

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Writing Scripts in Ruby on a Mac

I have learned to do very basic commands with Codecademy and Why’s Poignant Guide to Ruby, but, more importantly, this week I learned how to write, save, and run scripts in Ruby. It was actually surprisingly difficult to figure it out, since nearly every source I combed through online just said to save a script with .rb, then type “ruby filename.rb” in terminal. With the lack of additional information, I did not know where I should write a script, what format it should be in, etc. It was only after a lot of trial and error and one very helpful video on youtube that I understood what needed to be done. This post will take you through the steps to write a ruby script and run in it the terminal. Continue reading

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Troubleshooting Shockwave Player

I encountered a problem the other day while trying to access shockwave player to view an application on Google Chrome. The site would not let me access the information I needed and the error message it provided me with suggested I download Adobe Reader X and provided a link to do so. After downloading the program and accessing the information I required from the website anew, I encountered the same error message. Continue reading

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Week of troubleshooting

This past week Stephanie, Anthony and I have been very active in Schooldude, working with tickets this past week. We completed a number of different tickets this week including three computers that were having issues in the language lab. The problems included two computers that were having issues starting up and a third that had an issue with the audio and microphone. In terms of fixing the two computers with start up problems they just needed to be rebooted. Continue reading

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Google Chrome Calendar Instructions

The Google Chrome calendar is a very useful application that Google offers to its members. Anything and everything from meetings to due dates can be neatly organized in a simple fashion pertaining to days, hours, weeks or months. To all the inexperienced tech users who are not the best with computers, we are here today to instruct you on how to create your very own calendar!

You can begin by clicking on the calendar button in the top black tab of the google.com search engine. Continue reading

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